We are a leading treatment facility offering state-of-the-art, evidence based programs for mental health disorders, addiction and dual diagnosis. Our Admissions team at (857) 254-1818 is available 24/7 to answer your questions and enroll you in one of our programs.

Who We Are!

Our Blog

Want to learn more about drug addiction? Check out our blog for some of the latest information. We provide case studies, informational blogs, current event blogs and more to keep readers informed.

Boston police arrested a man for illegal possession of firearm and drugs

Published On: 10-25-2016 in Category: addiction, cocaine, Drug abuse, drug trafficking

Boston-police-arrested-a-man-for-illegal-possession-of-firearm-and-drugs

Drug menace is rampant across the state of Massachusetts, showing little signs of slowing down. In a recent incident, Boston police arrested a man for his alleged involvement in multiple drug and gun charges. The accused, identified as Justin Cullinane,25, was stopped by the police at the intersection of Shawmut Avenue and San Juan Street in the South End area for a traffic violation.

Cullinane, who was known to the police previously was found carrying marijuana, a scale and some plastic bags on the rear seat of his car. While pat-frisking him, one of the officers found a firearm in Cullinane’s right side trouser pocket, at which point, he pushed the officer and attempted to escape. After a brief scuffle, the officers managed to overpower him and take him in custody. They also retrieved a loaded handgun and many bags of cocaine and marijuana intended for sale. Cullinane will be produced before the Boston Municipal Court for a number of offenses such as illegal possession of a firearm, ammunition, drugs, and the intent to distribute marijuana and cocaine.

Massachusetts is in grip of a drug epidemic

The battle with drug addiction in Massachusetts is centered around heroin abuse. Emergency rooms across the state are witnessing four times the number of heroin-related cases, compared to the rest of the United States. Neighborhoods, including Charlestown in Northern Boston, have experienced a spike in heroin-related overdose deaths. Many cities in the state such as Fall River, Lynn Lowell, Lawrence, Roxbury, and Springfield with huge ethnic populations have become focal points for narcotic trafficking and distribution. These areas are often controlled by gangsters or outlaws who also happen to be the retailers of the drugs.

Today, numerous people across Massachusetts seem to have adopted a new path to getting addicted to heroin. Lately, a rising number of overdosing cases have been linked to both heroin and prescription drugs. Individuals are abusing prescription drugs such as opioids or opium derivatives which are known to give pleasurable highs similar to heroin. Methadone, OxyContin, Percocet, Morphine, Vicodin and Codeine are few of the commonly abused prescription drugs. As they are generally costly, and available only on producing a valid medical prescription, most people often turn to heroin which is much cheaper and readily available.

Leading a drug-free life

The connection between drugs and crime is responsible for criminal behaviors shown by people with substance use disorder. The production, illicit manufacture and distribution of drugs involve several unlawful activities. In addition to the physical and mental health disorders, widespread addiction to drugs has fueled a nationwide crisis by sustaining various types of criminal activities.

If you or your loved one is addicted to drugs, seek treatment immediately. The Boston Drug Treatment Rehab Center can help you get the best addiction treatment programs and embrace sobriety. You may call at our 24/7 helpline number 857-254-1818 or chat online for more information on different treatment options available in your vicinity.

We are here for you! Call Our 24/7 Hotline (857) 254-1818

StarLearn more about us, our services and how we can benefit and adjust any self problems. We are here for you, let us give you the opportunity to change your life!

© 2021 Drug Treatment & Rehab Centers. DTRC. All Rights Reserved.